Friday, May 22, 2015

Fresh Listings: Twelve Worth Seeing [Get 'Em Hot]

 minor flood damage
Twenty two house listings hit the Boulder market this week. Four were snapped up by desperate buyers.   Eight were in bad locations, grossly overpriced, or simply refreshed old listings pretending to be new.   Only ten are worth your time. 

Let's take a look. 

Note:  We're ignoring attached dwellings again this week.   Too little inventory and frankly, my buyers don't need any additional competition.   

To schedule a private showing, which includes a discussion of valuation and price trends, call Osman at 303.746.6896.



Single Family Homes


2100 Riverside Lane | $2.3MM | More Details
First, there's no river in Boulder.  This property is on a dead-end road, just south of Fourmile Creek.   According to flood maps, it's outside the 100 year flood plain but within the 500 year flood.  

You're looking at a nice plus size trophy home for a family in a private setting.   Lots of updates but originally built in the early 1990's.   


Due diligence:  There was lots of flooding to the north of this location during the September 2013 event.   Check carefully for mitigation and signs of water in the basement.     
If you're shopping in at this price, you should also know demand is substantially weaker than at lower price points.  Before you hire a Realtor, read: Understanding Market Depth in Boulder Real Estate

5141 Denver Street | $975K | More Details
Buyers either love or hate New Urbanism.   The good news is that this location is rapidly improving, with the upcoming Armory development nearby.   The janky industrial and commercial buildings nearby will likely disappear in coming years, but the homeless shelter is more entrenched then ever.   Oh, don't expect the Bus Stop to ever go away.  Not the actual Bus Stop, you know the one I'm talking about.   Perhaps that's a plus for certain buyers

Repeat after me:  "Denver street, Boulder, Colorado....   No BOULDER, Colorado.  The street name is Denver.  Yeah, I know it's confusing."

Negotiation tip:  The last time this was on the market was 5 years ago.  It sold quickly but the price was 300K lower.  That's a ton of gain in 3 years.  I would be surprised if there was a bidding war for this, but in this inventory deprived, low rate environment, it's possible.  


1056 Terrace Circle | $955K | More Details
Nobody wanted it when it was listed two years ago for $825,000, so it must be worth an extra $130K now, right?  

The pros of this house are the layout and construction from this century.  The basement bar is kind of cool.  The kitchen isn't completely dated.     The cons are that it's a tiny postage stamp size lot. 


979 Meadow Glen | $949K | More Details
This location is great if you're into golf and tennis and want your children in South Boulder schools.  Original owner and what appears to be original finishes from 1990, too.   Save some scratch for updates.   The open areas on two sides of the house are a plus.  





4058 Guadeloupe | $890K | More Details
Fourmile Creek is not as proven a location (if you care about capital preservation).  There are other more established neighborhoods in Boulder, but at you'll get a lot better house as a trade-off.   Tall ceilings, a decent layout, finishes that are more modern, and a more reasonable $/SF.   
Oddly, these sellers want to tear out their Cat 5 and take them when they sell.   I've never seen cables listed as an exclusion before.  Better clarify that in the contract or offer them so gold plated monster cables in trade.    

p.s. I love the wine cellar in this one.   Buy it with me as your agent, and I'll fill it as your closing gift (with $2 Buck Chuck).


429 Concord  | $875K | More Details
After 5 days on market, this one is probably already gone.   The seller wanted offers in today, preferably stuffed in a suit case filled with marijuana stinky cash.    

Why is it worth a look?  It's historic, in good nick, surrounded by the most well established, most coveted, and most restrictive neighborhood in Boulder.   Walk to downtown, walk to Sanitas, sip a quadrupple late with your pinky up at Ideal.    What more could you ask for... how about a garage?  The answer is no.

Due diligence:  Have your structural engineer on standby.  The house has a history of serious structural issues, supposedly corrected with helical piers.   Maybe it's all fixed.  Or maybe it's not.   You feeling lucky?


2102 Mariposa | $800K | More Details
Another great location, but be prepared to light a match when it comes to the interior.   Maybe the exterior too. Smart buyers should budget for a Tom Hank's style full gut and remodel.    

Buyers should also be aware of the increasing student density the closer you get to the University.   Lower Chautauqua is not the Hill, mind you, but this area is not a party-free zone either.   Due diligence tip:   Check for red solo cups in the neighbor's recycling bin.   Yes, I'm serious. 


3772 Ridgeway | $785K | More Details
No, it's not "duplex style."  It *is* a duplex.  

Don't write it off, though.   Northfield's location is unproven but the  product is superb with tall ceilings, lots of space, and an intelligent layout.    It's probably the highest end duplex you've ever seen.   Very livable and efficient.  Turnkey.  This one backs to the athletic fields.  Worth a look, if you don't mind sharing a wall with your neighbor. 


3380 Loyola Ct | $725K | More Details
I'll be shocked if this one makes it through the weekend without a bidding war.   The DIRT is worth more than the asking price.   It's a decent size lot overlooking one of the best views in Boulder, the best schools, on a nice little dead end street.   Assuming no red flags on the structure and on any architectural (height) restrictions in the title, this is a gem of a foundation for your Boulder dream home.   

Due diligence:  Visit the planning department once you have it tied up and review the title work carefully for additional restrictions beyond zoning, building code, smart regs, and solar access rules.  If your agent can't guide you through that stuff, get a better agent


4785 Shoup Place | $557K | More Details
Houses and lot sizes are more generous in Park East.  The owners of this four level home put in some nice updates over the years, too.     

Negotiation:  At this price range, competition is fierce among buyers so be prepared  to waive a few contingencies and pay substantially over asking.  There isn't much worth considering below $600K in the market right now.  All the sharks will be in a frenzy about this one.    

Ok, now I can't get the shoop shoop song out of my head.     

Location tip:   If you're a cyclist, it's super easy to get on the bike path and roll to downtown from here.  The bridge over Foothills is around the corner.   Just watch out for bridge trolls

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The ideas and strategies described in this blog are the opinion of the writer and subject to business, economic, and competitive uncertainties.   We strongly recommend rigorous due diligence and professional advice before buying or selling real estate.


image: infrogmation

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Understanding Depth of Market in Boulder Real Estate

by Osman Parvez
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It pays to understand the market.   It's painful ($$$) when you don't. 


The chart above shows the ratio of houses sold in Boulder during the last twelve months (LTM) compared to available inventory, separated into price ranges.    In the $1.0 to $1.5MM range, there were more than 6x the number of sales during the last twelve months than current listings.    In the $1.5 to 2.0MM range, the ratio drops to just under 2x.    In the top tranche, homes priced from $2.0 to $3.0mm, the ratio falls to 1.4x. 

What's the Significance?  
The Boulder real estate market is more than twice as competitive for homes priced in the $1.0 to $1.5 range than in the $2.0 to 3.0 range.   

Sellers who want to maximize price need to adjust their strategy by price range and location.   There is much more at risk with marketing and negotiation at the upper end of the market. 

This isn't just academic.   Take a look at the history of price reductions for 2480 Agate Lane. We generally don't discuss active real estate listings but now that the deal has closed, we can talk about it.   



Listed at the end of last Summer's selling season, the listing agent set the asking price for 2480 Agate Lane at just over $1.3.    As Autumn turned to Winter, the listing agent dropped the price not once but twice.   Despite this Spring's intense seller's market,  2480 Agate still didn't find a buyer so they dropped the price yet again before it finally attracted a buyer at 13.2% below the original asking price

It's not just the $200K price reduction.   The home was on the market for nine months, a period of time that the owners were exposed to the risk of a market downturn.  They also were stuck keeping the home in show-ready condition, incurring substantial carrying costs, and not moving on with their lives. 

Should a home take 276 days to sell in this market?   Not if the property is professionally marketed.   The most important piece of a comprehensive marketing strategy?   The asking price.    

Understanding Risk

For sellers, it's tempting to try to take advantage of this overheated market by asking top dollar.   The risk is the property will take longer to sell and you'll end up getting far less than if you priced it right from the start.   

Yes, even in this market.  

Choose your agent on their track record, their professional experience, and their negotiation skills.    Don't go with the shark-skin suit who tosses out a make believe selling price, they're blowing smoke.  


Here's another example:  3169 8th Street.


The listing agent set the asking price at $1.8 when it hit the market last Fall.   After a month, they dropped the price $100K.   It sat on the market all Winter and this Spring.  Eventually the sellers accepted a sale price of $1.5K, or 16.4% below their original ask

If it were priced right, it most likely would have sold faster and for more money.  Instead, every buyer walking into the place wanted to know one thing.    What's wrong with it? 

As it happens, I took one of our buyers to see this one personally.   For a Newlands house, it didn't make any sense at the asking price.   Plus, with so many days on market and the giant stack of business cards on the counter, it felt like a well picked shirt hanging askew on the bargain rack.  At $1.5 however, my buyer might have seen the value. 

Take Home Points
- For sellers, the most important decision you face is where to set the asking price.  A careful analysis of recent sales and review of current competition is  how you establish the asking price.   It's the most critical piece of a successful marketing strategy.   You still need high-end photography, a wide distribution of the listing on the web, and all the usual components of a full service, professional listing.

- For both buyers and sellers to negotiate well, you need to understand depth of market for the price range, location, and property type.    If the market is deep (high transaction volume) and there are few available listings, competition between buyers will be fierce but more options will be coming down the line.   If the market is shallow (low transaction volume) and the home has been on the market for a few weeks, negotiation leverage shifts to the buy side.  

Note: The charts above were current for when this blog article was written.   Market conditions change frequently and are highly specific for neighborhoods, down to the street level.   For the latest on market conditions relative to your unique situation, call Osman at 303.746.6896

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As always, your referrals are deeply appreciated.  

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The ideas and strategies described in this blog are the opinion of the writer and subject to business, economic, and competitive uncertainties.   We strongly recommend conducting rigorous due diligence and obtaining professional advice before buying or selling real estate. 

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

The Incredible Shrinking Louisville Real Estate Market [Market Update]

by Osman Parvez
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Smart real estate decisions are based on accurate and timely market information. Don't have it?  You're negotiating blind. 

We've been closely tracking the real estate market in Louisville, CO for the past twelve years.  Some of our data analysis goes back nearly 20 years, including a regression analysis showing appreciation rates.



Here's our latest analysis: 




As of this writing, total inventory in Louisville stands at 50 houses, less than half the long term average for the month of May. Inventory continues to grow in more or less the normal seasonal pattern. If the pattern holds, it will peak in late June or mid July.    

While total inventory is growing, the number of available homes is actually shrinking (blue line). This is indicative of an incredibly competitive sellers market with attractive listings being snapped up within days of hitting the MLS. It's also bad news if you're shopping for a home in Louisville. Expect greater levels of competition and more fiercely contested bidding wars. Having a savvy buyer's agent with proven negotiation skills helps. 




The chart above shows the Colorado Association of Realtor's latest data on sales in Louisville. It's old data. It also doesn't match up with past releases from other data sources. For understanding the market, making a smarter real estate decision, and for guidance in negotiation, it's next to useless. 

Here's the real skinny. 68 single family house sales have occurred in Louisville, year to date. 29% sold for more than asking. 96% of the buyers had their own agents (i.e. the listing agent did not "double end"). That's right, when an agent desperate for your business suggests they've got the inside track on listings, don't believe the hype. It's a rarity - even in this inventory deprived market. 

As always, we save the best for our clients. We'll publish a more actionable analysis on recent sale prices, including the average premium paid over asking for homes that received a premium, as well as and other key negotiation metrics in our upcoming research report.   Sign up below.   

If you're a client, don't wait for the research analysis to be published. Call us to discuss the market relative to your specific real estate objectives. Market conditions vary enormously by price range, location, property type, and even layout.  

Our Business at Realty Unique
About a third of buyers start their home search in the city of Boulder and end up purchasing in "the L's" (Louisville, Lafayette, and Longmont). No matter the price range, buying real estate is a matter of understanding trade-offs. Our goal is to help you make a smarter real estate decision. 

Occasionally we are asked to represent clients in other markets such as Denver, Colorado Springs, and the mountain towns. We're honored by these requests. If we have a pre-existing relationship with you and feel we can adequately represent your interests, we will consider these transactions but in the vast majority of cases, we refer the business to trusted colleagues.   

Remember, intelligent real estate decisions depend on accurate, actionable market information. There is no substitute, no amount of happy talk and hand waving that makes up for it.   



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As always, your referrals are deeply appreciated.  

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The ideas and strategies described in this blog are the opinion of the writer and subject to business, economic, and competitive uncertainties.   We strongly recommend conducting rigorous due diligence and obtaining professional advice before buying or selling real estate.   image: lending memo

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Go Pro Home Inspections [Tech Update]

by Osman Parvez
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One of our inspectors has begun offering high resolution videos of the inspection. This allows our buyers to see precisely what the inspector sees, particularly useful when they can't attend the inspection in person.   

For inspection objection and resolution purposes, the video also creates a much more vivid and detailed record of any issues. While very useful for negotiation, it's also potentially problematic for sellers who decline to make repairs and decide to take their chances with the next buyer. Remember,  evidence of problems must be disclosed. It will be hard for sellers to claim ignorance when they receive a high resolution video of the home inspection. Even if they won't disclose, the selling agent is required to do so if they have knowledge of inspection problems.    

This is one of the reasons we strongly recommend sellers pay for a home inspection and proactively address potential issues before listing the house. It's far easier to control the cost and manage solutions when you're not pressed against a deadline. 

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You can also like our Facebook page or follow us on Twitter.

As always, your referrals are deeply appreciated.  

--
The ideas and strategies described in this blog are the opinion of the writer and subject to business, economic, and competitive uncertainties.   We strongly recommend conducting rigorous due diligence and obtaining professional advice before buying or selling real estate. 

Friday, May 08, 2015

This Week's Fresh Listings [Get 'Em HOT]

Staying dry out there?   

If you're shopping for a house in Boulder, forget about the rain.  Pack your umbrella, it's time to review this week's fresh listings.   We sorted the wheat from the chaff of the Boulder real estate market and picked out our favorites.  Scrapes, overpriced, bad locations, refreshed old inventory, and other oddballs were culled.   Here's what's left.

38 new listings.   14 are worth seeing.    Let's check out some houses. 




To schedule a private showing, which includes a discussion of valuation and price trends, call Osman at 303.746.6896.



Single Family Homes




322 22nd Street | $1,480,000 | More Details
A tasteful design on this house both in and out. Vaulted ceilings and lots of natural light. This location is quiet and in a nice residential area of lower Chautauqua.  Here's what it looked like when the seller bought it for $965 two years ago.   Key question:  has it gained a half mil in value?








1063 Mapleton Avenue | $1,375,000 | More Details
A classic Victorian home on one of the most coveted streets in all of Boulder. Interior and exterior appear to well kept and in nice condition. A nice family layout with three upstairs bedrooms with one basement bedroom.   Due diligence tip:  Historic and on a tiny lot.  Don't expect to add any square footage.  Oh, and read up on knob and tube wiring. 












300 Hollyberry Lane | $1,375,000 | More Details

This house is nestled into the landscape and seems a bit hidden from its surroundings. It's large with outdoor deck space and right near Skunk Canyon and Mesa Trails.  Your money is paying for the killer location with value anchoring open space and a potentially protected view corridor.  Assuming you care about capital preservation, this lot is a smart choice to build on.  It should hold its value very nicely during the next real estate cycle.    Like 2595 Stanford (we wrote about it last week) expect a bidding war and for this property to be off the market by the end of the weekend.  Due diligence tip:  check who owns the land that the view blocking trees sit upon.




3243 4th Street | $1,098,000 | More Details

A family friendly 4 bed, 3 bath that's practically next to the foothills in the north west corner of desirable Newlands neighborhood. Easy access to Sanitas and excellent hiking. The house needs a serious update and the yard is overgrown, but it's adjacent to very nice open space.   Worth a look.








3825 Armer Avenue | $769,000 | More Details

Good layout, the best schools in Boulder, and a cathedral ceiling in the living room.   It backs to the plaza at Table Mesa, which might be a negative for some buyers.  Others would appreciate the easy access to prime retail. 







3860 Barr Court | $719,000 | More Details
An investment house sold and owned by one of our favorite Realtor colleagues.   A moderate size house on a decent size lot.  The location puts you in the areas best schools.  Interior finishes are basic, the layout is split.  Worth a look. 









2323 Mapleton Avenue | $698,500 | More Details
A classic 3 bedroom built in 1910 on a small lot. The location is in the heart of Boulder, easy access to downtown.  No garage but you've got two off street parking spots.   Due diligence tip:  We advise our clients to budget about 2x for maintenance and repair expenses on historic homes, even if they're well maintained.  In the city of Boulder, you don't really own one of these houses.  You're watching over it for the community.  Don't plan to change anything on the exterior.






2625 Pine Street | $659,000 | More Details
Another classic, pre-war house in a similar location to 2323 Mapleton.  This time you're looking at a smaller house but on a much larger lot.  The kitchen is nicely updated in this one. The due diligence tip above also applies.    Have your Realtor double check the zoning, if you're in RMX1 there may be some potential.






Attached Dwellings

3820 Telluride Place | $529,900 | More Details

There are many attached dwellings up on Shanahan Ridge. This is a more desirable model with added square footage, three real bedrooms, a larger kitchen, and what appears to be a private courtyard.   Due diligence tip:  Most units at this location use electric baseboard heat and 70's construction, which isn't very energy efficient.     Doesn't matter though, it will sell super fast. 







1634 17th Street Street 14 | $410,000 | More Details
These units make for a nice CU kiddie condo or income property given the student density.   Mid 80's construction. Due diligence tip:  Check for sound transfer between units and your tolerance for red Solo cups.







3035 Oneal Parkway V-17 | $260,000 | More Details
We've sold several of these units over the years at Stratford Park West.  Construction quality and finishes are shoddy, but the units rent easily and the price is right.  The bonus is the heated indoor pool and cheap HOA.    Another one to consider for a CU kiddie condo or income property.  Seriously, look past the finishes.   Due diligence tip:  If the unit has popcorn ceilings, get an asbestos test.








2227 Canyon Boulevard A-307 | $179,900 | More Details
This complex is built like a tank.   Most of the units we've seen over the years are also dark and dated.   Actually, the whole complex is dark and dated but the location is excellent for many types of buyers.    If you want lock and leave under $200K, consider this one.   Investor owned is over 50% however, so bring cash or at least 30% down. 





850 West Moorhead Cirlce 1A | $160,000 | More Details
A rock bottom price point for entry in Boulder's real estate market.   Cheap HOA, easy access to US36 or CU.   Another good CU kiddie condo.  Buyer needs to comply with a 1031 Exchange.





Investment Properties

972 Pleasant Street | $950,000 | More Details
This is a solid investment property that's very close to the main CU campus. Due diligence tip:  With 6 bedrooms, you'd be generating a decent amount of cash flow but double check whether the occupancy limits are grandfathered.  









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Your referrals are deeply appreciated.  

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The ideas and strategies described in this blog are the opinion of the writer and subject to business, economic, and competitive uncertainties.   We strongly recommend rigorous due diligence and professional advice before buying or selling real estate. image:  Anna and Michal

Thursday, May 07, 2015

Available Inventory Finally Rises, but Not for Town Homes or Condos [Analyze This]

by Osman Parvez
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Intelligent real estate decisions are based on an in-depth understanding of market conditions. 

Does it feel like you're flying blind? Get a better real estate adviser

Time for an inventory update.   

The following is a broad analysis of the Boulder real estate market. If you're thinking about buying or selling (and you're not under and exclusive agreement with one of our competitors) call us to discuss market conditions relative to your price range, property type, and location. Ph: 303.746.6896.  



Total inventory continues to climb. 197 houses (blue) and 154 condos and town homes (orange) are on the market, up 28% and 27% from a month ago, respectively. 



Inventory under contract remains shockingly high. 68% of town homes and condos and 54% of houses are under contract. In normal markets, only 15% to 20% of inventory is under contract at this time of year. 




For town homes and condos, the number of available properties (red line) has trended slightly down since early March. For buyers, this means selection has remained stubbornly low and competition among buyers for the most desirable properties is fierce. 




For houses, availability has increased substantially since early March. As of this writing, 90 houses are available for purchase (not under contract), an increase of 58%. 

Anecdotal Market Observations

1. The current pattern is for new listings to appear towards the end of the week, often with showings delayed until the weekend to create buzz at the open house. In response, we're blocking weekend showing time slots in advance for our clients.  

2. Offer submission deadlines tend to be Sunday through Tuesday, with desirable properties going under contract officially by Wednesday. Buyers need to be fully prepared to not just know their maximum price for each house, but also an understanding of what contingencies they're willing to waive.

3. Even moderately attractive listings are going under contract immediately, often at prices substantially over asking and with severely curtailed buyer contingencies. See last month's analysis of over/under for a breakdown

4. Less desirable properties are also finding willing buyers. This is a good time to dump property that doesn't meet SmartRegs or would be otherwise difficult to sell in a normal market.   

5. We're now in the business of advising clients on property selection with an eye to avoid bidding wars on subpar assets. It's critical to understand which properties are worth a premium and to what extent you're willing to prepay appreciation. During the last downturn, buyers who paid a premium for the wrong properties saw their asset values plummet. In some cases, the peak to trough was around 50%. Choose your Realtor carefully. 

6. The ability to negotiate well by highlighting the advantages of clients' offers has become a competitive advantage.  


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You can also like our Facebook page or follow us on Twitter.

As always, your referrals are deeply appreciated.  

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The ideas and strategies described in this blog are the opinion of the writer and subject to business, economic, and competitive uncertainties.   We strongly recommend conducting rigorous due diligence and obtaining professional advice before buying or selling real estate. 

Wednesday, May 06, 2015

Announcement: Feedblitz Discontinued

by Osman Parvez
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Hear ye, Hear ye.   House Einstein will be discontinuing our Feedblitz feed. 

If you receive this blog via email through a Feedblitz subscription, please click HERE to subscribe via Feedburner instead.   

Feedblitz is filled with horrible advertising.  

Feedburner has no ads.   It's also owned by Google. 

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Ready to buy or sell?  Schedule an appointment or call 303.746.6896. 
You can also like our Facebook page or follow us on Twitter.

As always, your referrals are deeply appreciated.  

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The ideas and strategies described in this blog are the opinion of the writer and subject to business, economic, and competitive uncertainties.   We strongly recommend conducting rigorous due diligence and obtaining professional advice before buying or selling real estate. 

Tuesday, May 05, 2015

NO ESCALATION CLAUSES? Or Hoping for Dumb Money

by Osman Parvez
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A small percentage of Boulder brokers are starting to specify "no escalation clauses" in their listings. It's hidden from public view, the verbiage is in the broker comments section of the listing. You need MLS access to see it.    

How many? Not many. As of this writing, less than 5%. Even though it's such a small percentage, it's still a negotiation tactic to discuss and understand. It matters when it's the house you want to buy.

So Boulder... let's talk. 

Why Exclude Escalation Clauses?  

Smart buyers use escalation clauses to avoid leaving money on the table. When a listing broker asks for "no escalation clauses," they're hoping someone is willing to pay a high number without any substantiation. When I worked on the Street, we had a word for investors willing to pay substantially more than market value. We called it "dumb money." 

It's also not just about the price. Is an offer with 5% down and full inspection contingencies the same as a cash offer at a lower price but no inspection? Of course not.   

After twelve years of negotiating real estate deals, and years of experience negotiating deals in the investment world before that, I find it baffling that some agents are uncomfortable with active negotiation. Meanwhile, we've made it a core competency of our business. 

Here's the deal. Escalation clauses force the listing agent to actively negotiate. They have to field questions about the quality of the other offers and in most cases, provide proof. This is something that many agents are simply not skilled at doing. In our experience, certain brokers are reluctant to have in-depth, honest conversations with negotiation counter parties. When pressed for why, they have only vague answers and claim confidentiality.   Others say it was their seller's choice. 

FACT: The verbiage in listing agreements which prohibits shopping offers must be affirmatively selected. In other words, it's NOT the default position in the listing contract. The listing broker has to actively select yes or no. The seller has to sign on it. See §5.8 of the Exclusive Right to Sell (LC50).   

Confidentiality is a tradition in real estate. Old school listing agents love it because it keeps them in the position of having all the information. It also allows them to steer the deal in a direction that benefits their interests, which as we know, is not always aligned with the seller's interest. Escalation clauses claw back some of that leverage and force a more even playing field.  

Most of our clients are the very opposite of dumb money. Buyers and sellers choose us to represent them because we've made it our goal to help them make a smarter real estate decision. We advise our clients to base their offer on proof of market demand and not pay more than the market. Most of our buyers would rather pass on a house than blindly pay tens of thousands (or more) than necessary.  

p.s. Not allowing escalation clauses (or discriminating against them) is not just about leverage. It can actually work against a sellers interest. In a recent deal we were directly involved with, it cost the seller about $100K when the listing broker didn't pick up the phone to negotiate. Our buyer found another house and the seller likely never knew how much money they left on the table due to their broker's poor negotiation skills. 

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You can also like our Facebook page or follow us on Twitter.

As always, your referrals are deeply appreciated.  

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The ideas and strategies described in this blog are the opinion of the writer and subject to business, economic, and competitive uncertainties.   We strongly recommend conducting rigorous due diligence and obtaining professional advice before buying or selling real estate.  image:  pfly